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DELIVERING DIGITAL | EPISODE 1

Deft digital marketing

Welcome to our first podcast. In this episode, we'll explore the what, why, and how of digital strategy from the marketer's point of view.

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Digital strategy can mean different things to different people. Maybe this is why even in today's post-digital world, far too many companies struggle to develop and implement effective digital strategies. In fact, research shows that upward of 75% of companies surveyed have no digital strategy in place. The quicker you implement a thoughtful digital strategy, the quicker you’ll pull ahead. In this episode, we talk to Brandon Rozelle and Amish Dholakia of Rightpoint, a full-service digital agency, about digital strategy for marketers. We explore the essential aspects of a successful digital strategy, the key actors a digital marketer needs to consider when developing a strategy, and what’s holding companies back from implementing their own.

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Transcript

Derek Dysart:
Gentlemen, welcome to the podcast.

Amish Dholakia:
Thanks for having us.

Brandon Rozelle:
Thanks for having us.

Derek Dysart:
For people that may not be familiar with you guys, why don’t you take a second to introduce yourselves?

Brandon Rozelle:
Hi, I’m Brandon Rozelle, VP of solution strategy for Rightpoint. I help clients understand how to navigate the digital transformation gap.

Amish Dholakia:
I’m Amish Dholakia, and I’m a senior director of digital strategy. My kind of specialty is helping clients understand the ROI behind all the technology spend that they do and how they recognize some sort of true value proposition from the investment that actually activates something real for them.

Derek Dysart:
Sure, sure. So ,you guys had a presentation at symposium talking about kind of getting started with digital strategy. I guess, if we could kind of step back a little bit, what exactly, when you guys talk about digital strategy, do you really mean?

Amish Dholakia:
Yeah, I mean, so I think digital strategy covers a lot of different areas. Ultimately it is the recognition of understanding the path that an organization is looking to take with consideration of their strategic initiatives and objectives from kind of at the corporate level and then merging that with an innovative piece of technology and mapping that against people and process to really understand a path forward that they have in accomplishing the ability to kind of leap beyond the market in the space that they’re going at.

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, there’s this—digital strategy is kind of the new term to mean all things to all people. It’s [laughs] the reality. I mean, there’s a punchline in the piece that we did where it’s, you know, it’s subjective, but we can be specific about that. So, each—the reality is, you know, you see all these, like, six- or seven-step digital maturity curves, which I think are incredibly alienating to most customers because unless you’re the top 2% of consumer-packaged goods firms you’re stuck at level one or two. And probably I would say 90% of the folks I’ve talked to at symposium are in that state. So, while they come to these conferences looking for aspiration and vision, there has to be a balance of giving them tangible examples of what they can do to activate—

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
—and so I think a core tenet of a digital strategy is helping a business understand a problem statement about themselves that’s in context of where they are. What Amish said is exactly right. So people, processes, technology, what they are actually equipped to do and what they can activate. That is the very tailored plan that lets them figure out how to take advantage of, you know, an enterprise software suite like Sitecore, right? So, they’re going to buy that with aspiration of all the things it can do: personalization, algorithmic search, machine learning. But the reality is these clients, especially on the marketing side, probably have scarce resources.

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
They probably don’t have a million content authors to create 15 variations and segments across everything that they author, so it’s a crawl-walk-run model—

Derek Dysart:
Right, right.

Brandon Rozelle:
—and our goal is really to figure out what is their current state? What is their vision or aptitude? What can they actually achieve? What is the trajectory of that? And, where Amish really focuses in is what is the investment over time that gets them there to then activate it?

Derek Dysart:
Sure.

Amish Dholakia:
One thing just to kind of add onto that, right? So I think it’s like we go to these conferences, we speak to clients, and I think they come to these conferences thinking we’re going to find the answer at some of these places. We’re not here to—they’re not going to find the answer here. What they’re going to find is an option of something they can do, but the real challenge for organizations becomes when I take this back to my organization, given the parameters and the factors that I’m operating in, whether it’s budget or people or the skill sets of the people that we have or just those types of things, then how do I make the vision that somebody else outlined for their organization? Kind of, how do I bring that and make it my own, right? So what you were saying, Brandon, around personalizing that vision and strategy but also that fire has to come from within. Like, any organization that we’ve seen that’s been successful, like, they have this, like, deep passion to truly want to go beyond. You know, there are a lot of people that talk. As the saying goes, right, like, talk is cheap. Like, actually do it—

Derek Dysart:
Exactly.

Amish Dholakia:
—and when organizations do it they commit the right—they commit their organizational structure to it. They commit the right dollars to it, right? There is a legitimate appetite, right, to actually go out and say, yes, we’re going to do it and here’s how we’re going to do it. Those organizations are the ones that are actually succeeding because they’re taking a digital strategy, and it’s constantly evolving and kind of moving forward.

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
There’s a consideration too that I think there are some common touchstones for most digital strategies. There’s a reason why so many organizations have not embraced or have not been successful implementing a digital strategy, and part of that is that we are in, you know, year 10, year 11 of what I think of as the new digital era. We can—a lot of people like to trace it back to 2007 when the first iPhone launched, but what that did is it very rapidly started evolving what the experience expectations for customers, consumers—

Derek Dysart:
Sure.

Brandon Rozelle:
So, our taste collectively as a population got better and more nuanced and—

Derek Dysart:
Well, and I think it represents a lot of the users. You know, like you said, the introduction of the iPhone. Now everybody has a web browser in their pocket. Before then, there were people that really, you know, they didn’t sit at a desktop all day. They didn’t live in a browser. Now they’ve got a browser in their pocket, so I think it made the ubiquity of the web—

Amish Dholakia:
They have a browser on their wrist.

Derek Dysart:
Right, right.

Amish Dholakia:
—I mean, you know—

Brandon Rozelle:
They have a browser in their car. They have a browser in their voice assistant so—

Amish Dholakia:
—in their home, in their—right?

Brandon Rozelle:
And that’s it, right? So, the customer opportunity in terms of where your interaction as a brand is with a potential customer or a client is now everywhere, where before it was print, or it was an online desktop browser, or it might be radio. And so, the omnichannel exploded and its trajectory is every direction infinitely, right? So, these companies are a little shell-shocked in most industries and we can pick on a few, right? B2B manufacturing, health care where—I mentioned B2B manufacturing because you think back 20 years, they didn’t even have a marketing function—

Derek Dysart:
Right.

Brandon Rozelle:
—much less a CMO, right? It’s all relationship-based sales. You had a sales force—

Amish Dholakia:
Financial services—

Brandon Rozelle:
—finserv—you had a sales team out in the market, right? They had comms, but they didn’t have marketing, and so many of those industries have been very slow to embrace digital tools and change for all the understandable reasons: investment, we’re still making money. Their sales funnel still feels full. Why shift the course of what we’re doing? And then suddenly this explosive shift in the marketplace happens. They are waking up sleepy to that realization, and the fact is now, you know, right now in 2018 on the eve of 2019 I think they’re waking up and realizing that they have to prioritize and develop new behaviors. And so, becoming customer-centric is a huge, maybe the highest tent pole in what inevitably becomes the opportunity statement that these companies are defining for themselves. Our goal, then, is to figure out, okay, what people, processes, technology—what is the organizational ability? Where do you need to invest? What new behaviors, what new muscle memory do you need to develop?

Derek Dysart:
Yes.

Brandon Rozelle:
And then where is the biggest investment? This is one thing that is true, right? Sometimes these things ask for big dollars to take advantage of, but nobody gets to spend 18 months until they show return on investment, so you’ve got to build the ship while sailing and show some results of that, you know, very quickly so you can feel like you’re activating speed to market while you’re actually building the infrastructure around you to continue to scale.

Derek Dysart:
Yeah, and I think—I was going to ask you guys. For somebody that might be listening in to this, you know, and thinks that does sound like me, we’re kind of shell-shocked, I think it’s probably—you guys make a point that they’re not alone. I mean, in your experience, how many organizations do you think are really doing some sort of digital strategy?

Amish Dholakia:
There are two paradigms to that. There are the organizations that want to do it, there are the organizations that think they’re doing it, and then there are the organizations that are actually doing it. And there’s a much higher percentage of the first two, organizations that want to have a digital strategy and organizations that think they have a digital strategy.

Derek Dysart:
Sure.

Amish Dholakia:
Kind of when you really evaluate that digital strategy plan, is it setting them up for success? The percentages are in, like, the single digits of organizations that are legitimately activating on a digital strategy that is actually core to that organization’s value proposition.

Derek Dysart:
Yes.

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, Deloitte digital CMO survey, which I think is a really—it’s a good, interesting pulse—so this is—I think it’s 300 CMOs nationally—they do international versions of it as well—but these are marketing leaders rating themselves and their own organization both around their strategic priorities as well as where they think they are mature and immature. The blanket findings of it—at least from last year’s report—I think it was, like, 62% of organizations are doing digital things but not becoming digital. Becoming digital, what that means to me in the context of a digital strategy is you are learning how to put the customer in the center of how you make decisions, which is a different way to operate. Marketing can’t do it alone, so this comes back to something you said, Amish, which I think is really important, what they can achieve and how they activate it. At least in a digital sense, at a minimum across all industries—and we could get specific where it’s different—you’ve got marketing, you’ve got technology and operations, probably sales.

Derek Dysart:
Yup, exactly.

Brandon Rozelle:
Those parts of an organization need to be cross-functionally aligned and holding hands around what the vision is and how they’re going to achieve it. Marketing can’t do it alone.

Derek Dysart:
Nope.

Brandon Rozelle:
There’s a reason why, if you look at how budgets are spent, CMOs now spend a larger percentage of their annual budget on new technology acquisition than CIOs do. The reason for that is SAAS. The reason for that is the cloud. They can spend OPEX dollars on capabilities and services that they do not have to own from infrastructure or ask IT’s permission—

Derek Dysart:
Right, right.

Brandon Rozelle:
—without having to go for a CAPEX spend from their CMO.

Amish Dholakia:
You know, you bring up a really good point because Forrester recently reported that CIOs are starting to own the digital transformation, so now what you’re hearing in the market is this debate between does marketing or digital own the transformation or does IT own the transformation. Therein lies a major problem for marketers trying to get started because to get the right groundswell within an organization, to move in a direction that is a definition of your digital strategy, who’s going to own it?

Derek Dysart:
Right, right.

Amish Dholakia:
And I think to your point, Brandon, where you have all these different parts of the organization holding hands, I would say it’s one step further than that. I would say it’s a cross-pollination where marketing sits in a sales organization. The other piece I would add to that is analytics because these are marketers, right? So marketers are defined by two things: (1) what value did you provide back to the organization? and (2) how quickly did you provide that value, right? So, like, it’s a game of speed even if you’re in a financial services or manufacturing organization that might typically move slowly. Oftentimes things that they rarely look at—because people are always like, oh, right now it’s a digital age—so in the digital age technology seems to be everyone’s answer. That’s what you said earlier, right? But hold on a second. What drives technology process? And nobody seems to evaluate. So now it’s like you had a technology and that technology was, you know, if you compare this to, like, a golf swing. I mean, I went to Dreamforce earlier this year, right? Somebody was—I was asking them, “Hey, Salesforce has introduced all this new stuff that’s going to help your organization.” And very smartly the person said back to me, “Look, right now I’m hitting the ball 20 yards to the right. When I get this new technology, it’s going to help me hit the ball 40 yards to the right.”

Derek Dysart:
Right.

Amish Dholakia:
“I need to be on the fairway, and this is definitely not helping me with that, right? Because it’s internally we’re not ready, we’re not able to adopt this technology. Technology is great, but it’s not for us right now because we’re just not as an organization ready to accept it.” They’re not based on solid foundations.

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, think of the—so I love it—think of the swing of the pendulum, right, from a maturity perspective. At the far outward edge of the swing—back to your question of who owns it, the CIO, whomever—we see some innovative companies creating a new C-level position, chief experience officer, and they’re smashing IT, and they’re smashing marketing, and they’re building multidisciplinary teams. That’s on the far right.

Derek Dysart:
Right.

Brandon Rozelle:
Somewhere in the middle you have organizations trying to create a DCoE, a digital center of excellence, to serve that function without breaking the traditional reporting model. Far on the left you’ve got just silos, right, everywhere. So how a company based on that reality is trying to migrate into this space, becoming digital, in my opinion—I think you put me in mind of this, Amish—is they’re trying to think about how to deploy these things at scale. But they’ve got to walk first and so, you know, doing digital things before becoming digital—what marketers want—and this is what you said—attribution. They’re getting scored on attribution, right? Now marketers are—CMOs are now being asked to take on ownership of their influence for some portion of P&L, and so without attribution—and we make it really hard with tools, right? You look at the Martech 5000, which is now, like, 6800 products trying to solve a gap that a marketer has—

Amish Dholakia:
—on data, right?

Brandon Rozelle:
—totally, right? So, when you look at becoming digital in the sense of how Amazon means it, right, digital experience team or customer experience teams look like tech startups did 10 years ago. So it’s a multidisciplinary team. You’ve got marketers there. You’ve got product owners there. You’ve got data analysts there. You’ve got experience designers there. You have technologists there, right? And they are constantly looking at KPIs and choices of how to really dial in on experience to maximize, in the Amazon sense of it, funnel and conversion and size of cart. That feels like something that is CPG, but I would argue that a CMO for a health care organization, a CMO in a finserv organization is doing the—is being asked to do the same thing in terms of dropping leads in the top of the funnel that they can claim ownership of and that through all of these features, right—and it’s forgivable—it’s how software is sold—but through activating on personalization, sort of just-in-time conversion events, case—all of these things that they know are formulaically in the cocktail of value to a prospect, they can then start deploying those things safely at scale and attributing the data back to conversion events. And so the data—I think the heaviest lifts—so last year I think there were 5900 products in the Martech 5000—now we’re at 6800—

Derek Dysart:
We need to rename it.

Brandon Rozelle:
—right? So, the biggest segment of growth was around data science. The biggest segment was trying to—okay, you’ve got a CMS. Now you’ve got a CRM. You’ve got Google Analytics. You’ve got Marketing Automation Solution. Each one of those things owns a portion—

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
—of what the “customer profile” or the “customer value score” is.

Amish Dholakia:
That’s it. You just said the magic word, right? So, this is—if I’m a marketer and I’m just starting out and one of the biggest challenges I’m going to have is I have this plethora of data that I’m looking at and I am not smart enough, or how do I activate this data in a way that truly helps me recognize—but what are you trying to recognize? You said earlier omnichannel put the customer at the center. What does that mean? Getting that customer profile correct, knowing your customer at their core based on their segments, based on where they play, what they like, what they don’t like, and then applying the right omnichannel strategy, right? So now, because the omnichannel world has grown beyond just the direct mails and the stuff on social media—that was, like, five years ago social media was all the rage, right? Everybody was doing it, and everybody was on there pumping some marketing message out the door, monitoring clicks. But now it’s like every smart device is an opportunity to move a message out so how much is too much? For a marketer, right, you have to be thinking—you don’t want your messaging, your branding to become immune in the marketplace. So, if you’re hitting them with all these different things but at the same time, you have to be able to engage them in the right elements of the omnichannel circle to move that customer profile, to understand where they sit today and then how they move forward. But that in itself could be, you know, digital strategy—

Derek Dysart:
Yes.

Amish Dholakia:
—and you say crawl first, don’t walk, run, but for the folks that are listening in, I mean, I would argue, yeah, definitely crawl and walk. But, like, there’s not a lot that you really need to get started, right? I think—

Derek Dysart:
That was what I was going to ask. You talk about crawl, walk, run. If I’m kind of nodding my head in my car, you know, listening to this thing and getting, yeah, this is exactly what I need, like, where do I start? I mean, it’s all so—you know, you talk about they can’t even get the numbering right on the Martech 5000 anymore. There’s such an eye chart of technologies out there you get overwhelmed by the technology, but just even from a strategy standpoint, where do I start?

Brandon Rozelle:
It’s where—so, it’s funny, right? Why haven’t more companies done this? Where do I begin? The answer is not sexy, right? The answer is I can’t go buy a thing or hire the right person to do it. You have to sit down and really define what you know about your customers, right?

Derek Dysart:
Yes.

Brandon Rozelle:
So what do you really know about them? Not what do they tell you they want but how do they behave, where do they seek information, what’s influential to them? Starting to define even a rudimentary persona around what is the day in the life of that person, not what do I want them to do. From that knowledge—and go as deep as you can, don’t kill yourself—or hire a partner to help you do it—but create that construct and then really interrogate what you are actively doing today, where you’re prioritizing your time, your budget, et cetera, and see where it plots against that value journey for that customer. What you’re going to find is you’re doing stuff that’s possibly incredibly low value that might be high effort, and you’re maybe not doing some things that are very low effort that potentially have meaningful value—

Amish Dholakia:
And I would overlay the technology on top of that model—

Brandon Rozelle:
Yup.

Amish Dholakia:
—so now if you map all the things that are influencing that customer, what technologies within your organization are doing those things?

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Amish Dholakia:
So now you’re able to quickly say, okay, I’m using Salesforce for this. I’m using HubSpot for this. I’m using—so then, to help what Brandon is saying, building that case around, you know, where you’re at in terms of what is the value proposition of these technologies, what is my spend?

Derek Dysart:
Yup.

Amish Dholakia:
What are the low-value things? You’re able to map it right back because, again, this is a collaborative effort. You’re going to sit there at your desk, and there’s only so much you can do before you have to go engage someone in IT or someone in operations or someone in sales and say, hey, this is the state of affairs.

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, you’re going to realize quickly that you have tools that are being underutilized. You have tools that are missing—and you’re also going to—so to bow to that, how do you activate it? And then you’re also going to find that the data or what is knowable about the interactions you’re having with the customer are—I call them the prisons of excellence, right? Like, they’re sitting in systems where it’s completely manual to have to go after it. CRMs are good examples, right? Like, you know, not integrated with other data sets. You’re relying on a salesperson to fill something out, probably to move leads through conversion stages and ultimately get paid on it, right?

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
You know, not getting access to that or building automation around it, it’s just a prison of excellence, right? So, starting to think about where did the little nuggets, the little profile crumbs of knowable information about my customers, where do those live? And what things can I start bringing together to tell a more comprehensive story around how we’re performing today? So, all of that mapping is just conversations documenting things. There are really good constructs of, like—

Amish Dholakia:
A real strong current state assessment.

Derek Dysart:
Totally.

Amish Dholakia:
Know where you guys are in your organization. Know what you’re doing. Know what you have. Know what these things do so that when someone else approaches you, when someone—when you’re building the right case to say what can we—what should we be doing, what can we be doing, you have a place where you can start from. That’s the first thing any partner will walk in and charge you for is—

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Amish Dholakia:
—first tell us everything that you’re doing today, at what level are you doing it, and what of this is of value and what isn’t of value?

Derek Dysart:
Yeah, it sounds like doing a solid self-assessment is probably step one and then—

Amish Dholakia:
Step one always.

Brandon Rozelle:
Exactly.

Derek Dysart:
I think there’s a trap that I think you touched on very early is you look at this technology, and you see a demo of it and, like, that’s exactly what we need—

Amish Dholakia:
Right.

Derek Dysart:
—and before you can even get to that point you’ve got to go through that stuff and actually figure out is that truly what you need? Does that make your situation any better or is it, you know, do you need to deploy that technology in a different manner?

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, so there’s a way to think about—I think you said that very well. So, for an organization they need to understand their common problem statement and the use cases that are going to be the most impactful and successful for them. I think it starts with that mapping exercise. There’s a gap analysis that comes with it—

Derek Dysart:
Yes.

Brandon Rozelle:
—and you hear us say it over and over, but it’s calibrating the current state of people, processes, tech because almost every, you know, prospect that we talk to is trying to figure this out while also sitting on some mountain of technical debt, right? So, it is then really thinking about how you can evaluate a platform. The best sales demos I have ever seen of a CMS platform or a CRM system are when the seller takes time to really sit and listen to the client and hear them talk about their problem statements and talk about the pain points, and they tailor that demo to speak exactly to how they would use the technology to activate against it. So, you know, hint to all the sellers out there: Just really help understand the prospect’s problem statement and what do they benefit and gain and then you can show them tangibly how to start building success. It’s not the magic wand. You cannot buy a piece of technology to solve a business problem. You can buy a piece of technology to take the answer to a business problem and deploy it at scale. And so contextualizing, you know, how you embrace that client’s problem statement and help them start stepping over it while also helping build a vision for what their technology footprint needs to look like over time to work down that technical debt, that’s where everyone wins. So, marketing can start activating against clients and claim success around how they’re influencing sales or outreach or whatever that key metric is while on the other side helping IT work down their annual spend for platforms.

Amish Dholakia:
That’s it. Yeah, because I think, you know, we talk a lot about doing this current state assessment or kind of doing a self-evaluation, but that’s only half of the answer, right? The other half is developing the right strategy on what should be happening next, and you won’t get there until you have a real, strong vision about where the technology kind of needs to be moving forward, having at least a perspective on what our technical landscape should look like moving forward. For a marketer, they’re going to go, oh, I’m not a technical person, but guess what? Everybody is a technical person, right? So, our position in the market today is every company is a technology company or should be thinking about that, right? A prime example is some of the work we’ve done—you know, we have a company that’s a pizza company. Everyone knows them. I’m not allowed to share the name, but this pizza company, you look at them on the outside and you go, they’re a pizza company. When you walk their halls, they talk about themselves like they’re a technology company that happens to make pizza.

Derek Dysart:
Sure.

Amish Dholakia:
And so, like, but their app is fantastic, right? Like, really quick, three clicks and you have a pizza, right? Really seamless. mean, the experience is bar none. It’s a marketer’s dream, but it’s all powered by, like, a really smooth technology experience, right?

Derek Dysart:
Sure.

Amish Dholakia:
So, I think that’s where our emphasis around that comes. Then I think, just to kind of tag on, just aligning the right skill set to that, right? So, I think a lot of marketers tend to have these traditional roles in their organization, right? So, like, I’m the email specialist in marketing and I do this and I do that. Or, you know, I’m a marketing manager, right? So, I’m responsible for campaigns. Or I’m an analytics manager. Those roles, while very helpful, are not necessarily enabling you to move into the next generation or the next kind of digital era. It’s really about aligning, you know, once you’ve mapped out the customer journey or the journey that your customers are taking—

Derek Dysart:
Yes.

Amish Dholakia:
—aligning the marketing roles to the journey. That’s what organizations that are really, truly out there are doing, and that might be, you know, to some extent beyond what our listeners are able to control, right, given where their organization is, but I think a case can certainly be made for why specific roles play well in this type of kind of digital era of marketing—

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Amish Dholakia:
—which is different than what it used to be.

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, it’s interesting. Just an aside, the pizza company, when they think about what their opportunity in the market is—so everyone eats pizza so to a certain degree everyone’s potentially their customer—but they have aggressive franchisee expansion plans. I think they own 35 of their 75 current locations, but their goal is to expand to, I think, 500 at a pretty quick pace. And so to a big degree they see one of their big disrupters as entering a new market by attracting and acquiring experienced franchisees in food and beverage, right?

Derek Dysart:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
And fast casual. So, they think of their data tools as a way for a new franchisee to activate and own their business—

Derek Dysart:
Sure.

Brandon Rozelle:
—so, it’s data on both sides and they see themselves as a technology company. The next wave of what they’re going to do around native app and being able to do, like, location-based or event-based programmatic one-click repurchasing offers will be a franchisee’s dream. So, they sort of see innovation as a new way of extending their footprint to being hyper-relevant to their clients and their customers. And it’s just thinking a little more laterally—

Amish Dholakia:
That’s right.

Brandon Rozelle:
—about where the value is in their organization.

Amish Dholakia:
The key for us also, just to kind of recognize a lot of people get really caught up in, like, the flair and the vaporware of, oh, this is great and we’re going to do this. Strategy is such a sometimes pie in the sky type of thing. I think it’s really important to recognize that. I think for us it’s not just about mapping out a pie in the sky type of situation or scenario but making it, you know, kind of putting it on paper in a way where it’s these are the five things that you should go do, right? Step one—

Derek Dysart:
Uh huh.

Amish Dholakia:
—legitimately go do this. And it sounds tactical in nature but enables a very strategic way of going about our business.

Derek Dysart:
And the plan is always fluid too. I think it’s, you know—

Amish Dholakia:
It has to be.

Derek Dysart:
—you go through and here are the five steps and you get to step two and you realize, well, steps three through five don’t make sense. I need to pivot, and so, yeah, I think it’s definitely something you—it’s an ongoing process. It’s not a—

Brandon Rozelle:
You said it. You draft the future in pencil, not ink, right? So—

Derek Dysart:
Yeah, that’s a good way to put it.

Brandon Rozelle:
—you’ve got to absolutely—if our clients learn nothing from these engagements—because managed consulting is just super famous. It’s easy to throw stones at having big, expensive engagements and handing you a PowerPoint you can’t activate.

Amish Dholakia:
Yeah.

Brandon Rozelle:
It’s very important for us that it be adoptable and executable in the context of the organization, but the best thing a client can learn in this process is how to reprioritize what they are doing and how they are engaging customers, so constantly evaluating and asking themselves how has the customer evolved or changed, what can we do to better impact that success journey for them. And that will challenge—you build—let’s say you build a road map that’s looking out 36 months. By the time you get to month 20, at least, the market has changed, if not the customer, if not the channel opportunities. Learning that new behavior of analyzing, interpreting, activating, that is the best thing that can come from those engagements, and I think helping clients achieve that is the most satisfying thing I get to do in my career.

Derek Dysart:
Well, gentlemen, I think it’s been an interesting conversation. I think if I was a marketer listening, I think I’ve got a sense of where to get started, and hopefully it’s not as daunting as it looks like because, as you said, there’s a ton of technology out there. I might not be as technically oriented, and now how do I have to integrate this, and do I have to get IT involved in integrating it? And I think you made it clear that that’s a step down the road. There’s a step before that. If folks wanted to find out more information about you guys and the offerings that you have, where could they find you guys online?

Brandon Rozelle:
Yeah, just, so you can look us up, obviously, on LinkedIn. Come to rightpoint.com. You’ll find an easy way to get in touch with us. Both Amish and I spend probably better than 50% of our time just talking to potential clients around where they are and how they activate on it. We do a lot of, like, one-day, half-day workshops around this, so we are excited to talk with people about where they are and understand more about, you know, how they can start adopting some of these tactics and approaches to impact their organization.

Derek Dysart:
Great.

Amish Dholakia:
We love it.

Derek Dysart:
Great. Well, thanks again and thanks for joining us.

Amish Dholakia:
Thanks for having us.

Brandon Rozelle:
Thank you.

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